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100 Watt Bulb. Lumens?

A Lumen Reference Point

“100 Watt Bulb Lumens” was one of the first things I searched for when I started looking into alternatives for incandescent lighting.  Like you, I was looking for a reference point to compare options.  I, like most people, have a very good idea of the relative brightness of a 40w, 75w, 100w or 150w incandescent bulbs in my home and I know that 100w is the one I’m most comfortable with using for a lamp.  It’s the one that is going to be bright enough, but not too bright, for most situations.  Since wattages are no longer a good basis for understanding a light bulb’s brightness across different bulb technologies, I figured that lumen figure would be the starting point for my search.   However, there was a problem.  When I searched, the answer to the question of “How many lumens does a 100 watt bulb put out?” was not the same from source to source.  Some places said over 1700 lumens, others 1245, and others 1100.   And some 75 watt bulbs claimed to put out 1150!   What is going on here? (more…)


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Part 3 – The Hallway – Different Types of Light Bulbs

One of the tests I did with these lights is to install them in my hallway and photograph them illuminating the same scene.   My baseline bulb is the incandescent Sylvania BR30 65 Watt Incandescent Economy Flood, so I set up my camera on that one first.  I ‘white-balanced’ (with an ‘18% gray card’) so that whites would appear white and colors would appear normal.  Then I locked the white balance.   As long as I kept the initial white balance setting, as I changed to different bulbs, any color shift in their light would show up in the picture when compared with initial picture with the incandescent.    Also, the exposure was set to the incandescent bulb’s light, and locked.  Thus any subsequent change in luminosity would show up when compared to the original picture.  I figured this set up would allow a fairly objective comparison of what these different types of light bulbs were doing, relative to an incandescent anyway. (more…)


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Part 2 – The Bulbs at a glance – Different Types of Light Bulbs

Now that we have some familiarity with the competing bulb technologies, let’s compare some representative bulbs head to head.  For this review I chose a group of recessed flood bulbs of nearly equivalent color temperature and light output.  Although there is some variation in their form (it’s a mix of BR30/R30/PAR30) the bulbs are as closely matched as fundamentally different approaches to making light can be.  The idea for the review was to use each bulb in my hallway’s recessed and see how each bulb feels and performs over a matter of weeks. My thoughts: (more…)


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Part 1 – The Technologies – Different Types Of Light Bulbs

With all energy saving choices these days, it can be overwhelming when you’re trying to choose between all the different types of light bulbs. They may be interchangeable, but the their energy use and light output characteristics are all over the place. Is there a perfect option? Not quite yet. Each technology has its advantages and tradeoffs. Packages are spackled with numbers and acronyms meant to help compare products, but based on my experience, they don’t necessarily tell the whole story. At the time of this writing, there are five main light-producing technologies used in screw-in light bulbs: (more…)


100 Watt Bulb. Lumens?

A Lumen Reference Point “100 Watt Bulb Lumens” was one of the first things I searched for when I started looking into alternatives for incandescent lighting.  Like you, I was looking for a reference point to compare options.  I, like most people, have a very good idea of the relative brightness of a 40w, 75w, 100w or 150w incandescent bulbs in my home and I know that 100w is the one I’m most comfortable with using for a lamp.  It’s the one that is going to be bright enough,...
article post

Part 3 – The Hallway – Different Types of Light Bulbs

One of the tests I did with these lights is to install them in my hallway and photograph them illuminating the same scene.   My baseline bulb is the incandescent Sylvania BR30 65 Watt Incandescent Economy Flood, so I set up my camera on that one first.  I ‘white-balanced’ (with an ‘18% gray card’) so that whites would appear white and colors would appear normal.  Then I locked the white balance.   As long as I kept the initial white balance setting, as I changed to different bulbs, any...
article post

Part 2 – The Bulbs at a glance – Different Types of Light Bulbs

Now that we have some familiarity with the competing bulb technologies, let’s compare some representative bulbs head to head.  For this review I chose a group of recessed flood bulbs of nearly equivalent color temperature and light output.  Although there is some variation in their form (it’s a mix of BR30/R30/PAR30) the bulbs are as closely matched as fundamentally different approaches to making light can be.  The idea for the review was to use each bulb in my hallway’s recessed and see how each bulb feels and performs over a...
article post

Part 1 – The Technologies – Different Types Of Light Bulbs

With all energy saving choices these days, it can be overwhelming when you’re trying to choose between all the different types of light bulbs. They may be interchangeable, but the their energy use and light output characteristics are all over the place. Is there a perfect option? Not quite yet. Each technology has its advantages and tradeoffs. Packages are spackled with numbers and acronyms meant to help compare products, but based on my experience, they don’t necessarily tell the whole story. At the time of this writing, there are...
article post